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LOUISA THOMPSON
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
DOCTORAL CANDIDATE, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Doctoral Candidate, Clinical Psychology,
M.Phil., Clinical Psychology, CUNY Graduate Center
B.A., Honors in Neuroscience, Psychology, Oberlin College

Louisa is a doctoral candidate in the Clinical Psychology (neuropsychology emphasis) subprogram at CUNY Queens College and the Graduate Center. She is currently a graduate research associate at the Hunter AIDS Research Team (HART). Her research interests include the cognitive processes (e.g., decision-making) involved in substance use and other health risk behaviors (e.g., sexual risk taking), as well as the emotional (e.g. anxiety) and social/cultural (e.g., stigma) factors that modulate of these behaviors. Her dissertation research uses neuropsychological and psychophysiological assessment tools to explore the impact of anxiety and depression on affective decision-making ability. Stemming from her background in neuroendocrinology research, she also has an interest in how stress and sex hormones impact cognitive functioning and contribute to disease processes, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

Louisa is also a pre-doctoral neuropsychology extern training in inpatient rehabilitation and psychiatry assessment at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

RECENT PRESENTATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS:

Thompson, L., Wells, B., Parsons, J., Golub, S. Profiles of executive function in the prediction of alcohol use among emerging adults in NYC. Annual Meeting of the International Neuropsychological Society, Denver, Colorado, February, 2015.

Golub, S.A., Thompson, L., Kowalczyk, W. (in press). Affective differences in Iowa Gambling
Task performance associated with sexual risk taking and substance use among men who have sex with men. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 2015.

Waters, E., Thompson, L., Patel, P., . . .et al., (2015). G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1
(GPER1) is anatomically positioned to modulate synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus. Journal of Neuroscience, 35 (6); 2384-2397.

Link to research gate profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Louisa_Thompson2

Louisa is a doctoral candidate in the Clinical Psychology (neuropsychology emphasis) subprogram at CUNY Queens College and the Graduate Center. She is currently a graduate research associate at the Hunter AIDS Research Team (HART). Her research interests include the cognitive processes (e.g., decision-making) involved in substance use and other health risk behaviors (e.g., sexual risk taking), as well as the emotional (e.g. anxiety) and social/cultural (e.g., stigma) factors that modulate of these behaviors. Her dissertation research uses neuropsychological and psychophysiological assessment tools to explore the impact of anxiety and depression on affective decision-making ability. Stemming from her background in neuroendocrinology research, she also has an interest in how stress and sex hormones impact cognitive functioning and contribute to disease processes, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

Louisa is also a pre-doctoral neuropsychology extern training in inpatient rehabilitation and psychiatry assessment at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

RECENT PRESENTATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS:

Thompson, L., Wells, B., Parsons, J., Golub, S. Profiles of executive function in the prediction of alcohol use among emerging adults in NYC. Annual Meeting of the International Neuropsychological Society, Denver, Colorado, February, 2015.

Golub, S.A., Thompson, L., Kowalczyk, W. (in press). Affective differences in Iowa Gambling
Task performance associated with sexual risk taking and substance use among men who have sex with men. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 2015.

Waters, E., Thompson, L., Patel, P., . . .et al., (2015). G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1
(GPER1) is anatomically positioned to modulate synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus. Journal of Neuroscience, 35 (6); 2384-2397.

Link to research gate profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Louisa_Thompson2